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Delhi Sightseeing Tour [Part 2 of 2]

The second and last part of the Delhi Sightseeing Tour! In case you missed the first part, here you go. 🙂

Parliament House and other government buildings


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To the Parliament House


I didn’t think I’d ever see such a wide road without it looking like a parking lot.

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I enjoyed taking photos here. 😀
(The rest of the photos are in Flickr.)


The Parliament House was designed by Edwin Lutyens and Herbert Baker in 1912-1913 and opened in 1921. Its design and some of their government buildings are beautiful.

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I am also impressed by how well-paved their roads are.

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Birds too! 😮

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They’re so rare in Metro Manila that the sight of birds in flight had me in awe. 😆

Gandhi Smriti


A house-turned-museum for Mahatma Gandhi where he spent his last 144 days before the assassination. The 12-bedroom house was formerly owned by the business tycoon Birla family. Inside is an exhibit of M. Gandhi’s childhood until assassination, few of his personal belongings, and a multimedia show that runs from 1PM to 1:30PM.

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The hallowed house, which treasures many cherished mermoies of the last days of Mahatma Gandhi now forms a part of our national heritage. The walls of the building reverberate with his message, “All men are brothers.”

Gandhi’s life and teaching have left an indelible mark on human history and the purpose of preserving this memorial is to foster and propagate his ideals.


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Where M. Gandhi spent his last days

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“Forgiveness is a quality of the soul, and therefore, a positive quality. It is not negative. ‘Conquer anger,’ says Lord Buddha, ‘by non-anger.’ But what is that ‘non-anger?’ It is a positive quality and means the supreme virture of charity or love.” -M.K. Gandhi


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“I do regard Islam to be a religion of peace in the same sense as Christianity, Buddhism and Hinduism are. No doubt there are differences in degree, but the object of these religions is peace.” -M.K. Gandhi


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“I will not like to live in this world if it is not to be one.” -M.K. Gandhi


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After I took that ^ photo, I got separated from my Mom and bro. I didn’t get to take more pictures than I wanted to nor did I see the Martyr’s Column up close because, uhh, internal panic. 😆

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Outdoor exhibit on the life of Mahatma Gandhi

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The last prayer meeting M. Ghandi went to before his death


Gandhi was assassinated during his nightly prayer walk. Where he was shot stands the Martyr’s Column.

Gandhi Smriti is open Tuesdays to Sundays from 10AM to 5PM and is located in Connaught Place, a business district in New Delhi.

Hot Chimney Lunch


Our driver recommended local curry for lunch, so he dropped us off at Hot Chimney. We ordered chicken and expected they would be different from one another. Turns out, they were chicken poured over with different curry sauces.

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I can’t remember if mine’s the darkest curry sauce.


I wish they had meatier chicken.

Hot Chimney is a small restaurant that looks like carinderia only, yet the food is expensive (because of the seemingly endless taxes).

Indira Gandhi Memorial


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The Indira Gandhi Memorial is another residence-turned-museum for the former Prime Minister Indira Gandhi. Her rooms may be viewed through glass walls. Rare photographs of Indira’s young life until her rule as the first female Prime Minister of India are on display. All her personal effects even the sari she wore when she was assassinated are as well.

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Indira Gandhi

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Library


Her son, Rajiv Gandhi, and his family lived with her.

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Rajiv Gandhi

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The rooms where he lived with his family are available to view. His personal belongings and photos of his childhood up to marriage are on display as well as what was left of his clothes after the terrorist attack.

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One of the rooms of Rajiv’s place (iirc)

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An inscription of Indira’s assassination.


At the middle with glass protection is where she was shot.

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Path where Indira last walked covered with glass.

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Security


The museum is open Tuesdays to Sundays from 9:30AM to 5:00PM.

Sacred Heart Cathedral


My Mom requested we stop at the only Catholic Church we saw in Delhi.

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The Sacred Heart Cathedral is one of the oldest Catholic Churches located in Connaught Place. Its design is based on Italian architecture.

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Our Lady of Vailankanni


Highlight of the day



A camel in the middle of a busy road. 😮

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The camel rider saw me and signaled that I ride the camel. It was so tempting, but scary!

Back at the hotel


Before we returned to the hotel, my Mom shopped some more at the souvenir store while I stayed in the car (I was exhausted and poor–LOL!) and witnessed two men quarrel. I thought it was a lovers quarrel because they were so touchy. 😛 I have a video of it and will include in my vlog.

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Outdoor dinner at Shangri-La Eros Hotel


Next in this India 2016 travel series is our (last) tour in Agra to see the Taj Mahal. I hope these posts give ideas for your itinerary should you plan or be going to Delhi. Hotels have tour offers, but a separate car hire with driver might be cheaper. There are endless options in TripAdvisor. You can do rent-a-car, but might not be a good idea to be without a local companion. There’s Uber that could be cheapest for one or two tourist spots visits.


Previous posts in this series:
Delhi Sightseeing Tour [Part 1 of 2]
The flight to and first day in India
Sightseeing Delhi Temples

Information sources:
Wikipedia
BBC
TripAdvisor
Britannica

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